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Paul McCartney

 

 

 

 

Paul McCartney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paul - The Interviews

 

Sir Paul - My Love for Linda

 

Page 3

 

Paul had asked their children to join them, at the Arizona ranch during Linda’s last days. The family were together at her death.

 

‘If you’ve got to die, it wasn’t a bad way to do. It was as if Lin, or something in her being, said: We’re not going to be able to get out of this one, so let’s get out quick.”

When Sir Paul McCartney received his knighthood in March 1997 his wife Linda ordered some stationery to be made up with his new title.

 

She also bought a silver pocket watch and engraved it in her own hand: ‘To Paul — my knight in shining armour — Linda.’

 

Paul has never used the notepaper; he wears the watch every day. Linda was desperately proud of the honour bestowed upon her husband, but she was unable to attend the ceremony at Buckingham Palace.

 

Her breast cancer had been diagnosed some 18 months earlier and Linda was too ill to go that day. Three of her children Mary, Stella and James took her place. Little more than a year later she was dead.

 

‘It was hard for her not being able to be there,’ says Paul. Taking out the watch he removes it from the red silk case he has made to protect the precious metal from scratching. Linda’s moving inscription includes two hearts and kisses.

 

‘The knighthood was important to her, more for my sake than hers,’ he says. ‘Lin was the most down-to-earth person I’ve ever known. Sometimes I’d tease her and call her Lady McCartney, but it was all low-key and just between the two of us.

Linda was happier if we were going to bed early with a meal than going to a huge function. She hated the shackles of social etiquette. It was a part of her upbringing that she had never liked.

 

Linda was born in New York but spent most of a strict childhood in the rich suburb of Scarsdale. Her father, Lee Eastman, was a highly successful show business lawyer, but she was particularly close to her mother Louise, who was killed in a plane crash when Linda was 18.

 

After her mother’s death, Linda went to the University of Arizona in Tucson to study Art history and discovered an exhilarating sense of freedom in the Desert State. Arizona remained one of her favourite places on earth.

 

‘Arizona was freedom for her. She roamed a lot when she was at school out there and realised you could be free in the world. She threw off her strict upbringing and found herself in Arizona so it was a magic, special place.’

 

Linda died in Arizona at the McCartney family’s ranch in April 1998. She ended her courageous two-and-a-half year battle against breast cancer in Paul’s arms. Their children were with them.

 

‘It was a help that when it happened, it happened in a good place,’ says Paul. ‘Towards the end, when we knew it was getting serious I said to her, “We are in your favourite place on earth.” She was comforted by that. She was very peaceful when she died.’

 

Paul had barely spent a night apart from Linda during their 30-year marriage. He says she was his girlfriend, his lover, his wife and mother to their four children.

‘The hardest this about losing Lin is how much I enjoyed being with her, I really thought I wouldn’t be able to sleep without her next to me. I hadn’t slept for three nights after her death, but magically now I’m able to. Somehow she’s helping me through the days and nights.

 

Linda Eastman almost didn’t many Paul McCartney. He’d had to persuade her long and hard to be his wife before they booked the register office and then they rowed the night before their 1969 wedding. Today, Paul says he cannot recall what the argument was about. ‘Something daft I expect,’ he says. ‘I said to her, “Let’s not row, let’s get married instead”.

 

Linda arrived at Maryleborne Town Hall on March 12, wearing a daffodil yellow coat over a fawn dress and giggled throughout the ceremony.

 

‘I loved it,’ says Paul. ‘I thought, ‘These are vows and she’s laughing.” I loved it that she was so irreverent. You start as you intend to continue and we were going to have fun, not become these staid conventional people just because we’d married. You need humour. That’s what attracted me to Linda in the first place.

 

Linda and I got married in a fever. We were really quite a crazy couple and we used to call it our funky period because we were very free spirits.

 

‘I needed freedom from the constrictions of the Beatles and Linda grew up wanting to be free. She always had a radio under the bedclothes listening to rock and roll as a child.’

 

Paul and Linda had met some two years previously at The Bag O’Nails, one of the couple of exclusive rock clubs operating in London at the time.

 

At almost 25, Paul was the most adored young man in the world. Handsome, rich and blessed with a phenomenal musical talent, he was as famous as only a Beatle could be. Linda was tall with long blonde hair and the friendliest smile.

 

‘I thought she was a very beautiful girl and that I would try and say hello. As she was leaving The Bag O’Nails I stood up and got in her way. I said, “We’re going on to another club. Would you like to join us?” Luckily, she said yes, so we got to know each other.

At 26, Linda was a year older than Paul. An American divorcee with a young daughter, Heather, she was working on a photographic assignment in London. She returned to New York.

 

They met a year later when Paul was in the States on business. He invited her to join him for two days in Los Angeles; -where they stayed together in a bungalow in the grounds of the Beverly Hill Hotel on Sunset Boulevard.

 

‘Los Angeles was brilliant,’ he says. Linda happened to be corning out on an assignment so we spent a few days together. We spent a lot of the time in bed. It was the kind of place you wanted to stay in bed if you had a nice girl. We always fancied each other. We were very lucky.

 

'The difference for me with Lin was that she was a woman. That was the word I thought of when I first met her. I’d met a lot of girls, but she was all-woman, which I liked a lot. A little time went by and I was going out with other girls, but I was at the age where I was beginning to think about marriage.'

 

‘I believe there’s an age when you think, “If I’m going to do it, it might have to be soon.” I see it with my own kids. Every time I ever thought about it there was only one person who came to mind. But I kept thinking, “Well, I’m not sure. We like each other. I really fancy her. But I’m not sure if that’s right for marriage.'

 

‘Eventually, she came over from America one time and I didn’t let her go back. I asked her to stay with me. I don’t know what would have happened if I hadn’t. I was in a bit of a state when I first knew Lin. There were a lot of drugs and I was living on my own, totally overdoing it, boozing away. It was a case of, “Yehhey, have some more drugs have you got some?.... try this one......I don’t mind if I do.”

‘It was the Sixties, the hardcore Sixties and it was really starting to get to me. Looking back I can see I was doing too much, but I didn’t think so at the time. I just had trouble getting my head off the pillow sometimes. I remember once almost suffocating myself whilst frying to sleep and thinking “You’re probably going to far here, son, but never mind.”

 

‘Linda would say, “Let’s just cool it down.” She was a huge help. She started to put some sense back into my life. She put some order into it. For instance, simple things like birthdays. When I met her I didn’t celebrate birthdays any more. Fans sent me cards and stuff, but I didn’t bother. It was just a case of, “Oh, I’m 27 today, another year older.”

 

Paul adds: ‘Linda said, “No, no, no. We’re going to celebrate it. You’re going to have a cake and we’ll put candles on it and you’ll have a present. You’re going to choose what meal you want.”

 

‘So it became a huge tradition in our family. In fact we recently celebrated Linda’s birthday because she was such a birthday girl. We had a dinner for her and I gave the kids presents, just little presents.’

 

Paul may have loved Linda, but the fans didn’t They spat at her, screamed and sobbed outside the register office on the morning of the wedding and broke intro the family borne at St John’s wood, stealing some of her most precious photographs.

 

‘You forget fan stands for fanatical,’ says Paul. ‘But some of them were. They thought they were going to many me. It was their dream. So when I was spoken for, I said, “Hey girls, you can’t hang round here any more. Go to the concert, buy the records, but there’s no point hanging round here.”

 

Linda and I got all our wild oats out of the way before we got married. We told each other about our pasts. We were very open about it. It was painful, but we cleared the decks. Then it was a case of, “Now we have a marriage maybe now we don’t need to play the field.” And we didn’t, which was beautiful.

 

Paul The Interviews

All His Lovin'

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Jasper Gerard meets Sir Paul

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Page two

My Love for Linda

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Page five

The Interviews Index

 

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Jasper Gerard meets Sir Paul

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My Love for Linda

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